Date of Award

1982

Document Type

Thesis

Department

History

First Advisor

Unknown

Abstract

An OBU Honors Special Studies Grant, matched by a donation from a private source, enabled me to spend five weeks during the summer of 1981 studying British archaeology, particularly that of the Iron Age, at Christ College, Cambridge. After one week of extensive lectures at the college and one week of touring major archaeological sites of the area, five other American students and I spent tow and one-half weeks at the Claydon Pike excavation near Fairford, Gloucestershire. During our stay at the dig the excavation director, Dr. David Miles, and the assistant director, Simon Palmer, both of Oxford University and the Oxfordshire Archaeological Unit, delivered several lectures on the Iron Age, Claydon Pike, and other excavations in the area that dated from the same period. They also took us on field trips to area museums and other Iron Age sites, including Uffington Castle, the site of a large Celtic hillfort and the oldest chalk hillside figure in England, the Uffington White Horse.

In this paper I will draw from last summer's experience and from the research I have done since then in an attempt to present an accurate general picture of how archaeologists are able to reconstruct the Iron Age from the evidence found in their excavations.

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