Date of Award

1969

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

Recreation has become an important resource in the treatment of the mentally and physically handicapped. People with serious handicaps can be trained to lead happy, normal, productive lives. Such training is one of the greatest triumphs of modern medicine and education.

Progress in the use of music and drama, including organization of groups in radio drama, was made in veterans' hospitals, especially during and after World War II. With the development of occupational therapy, even bedridden patients found many activities possible, including both work and play. Those in wheel chairs have become proficient in various games. The obvious need for skill in the direction of such activities has led to the expansion of several professions, including music therapy and group work. At best these services and the centers in which they are provided have the benefit of medical and much psychiatric supervision. Equipment and leadership has turned many a center into a place where recreation has its place in the daily routine.

We must (as a whole society) meet the needs of our handicapped before they can ever begin to enjoy life. They must be well clothed, fed, loved, etc. before we can ever succeed in providing recreation for them to enjoy and to forget their burdens. To build up a realization that there are games and recreation which a handicapped person can enjoy builds the morale of our country as well as gives a feeling of security to our pupils.

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